ASA's 37th National Conference on Autism Spectrum Disorders (July 13-15, 2006)

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Thursday, July 13, 2006: 1:30 PM-2:45 PM
Providence Ballroom II
#1761- Canít or Wonít and what can we do about it.
He isnít paying attention. She wonít follow directions. They arenít completing their work. Are they not complying because they are bad kids? Or are their reasons why they canít comply? Even though it seems as if the problem is in them, the solution is usually us: changing something in ourselves, the environment, curriculum, and/or teaching the behavior that we would like the student to have.

Presenter:Julie A. Donnelly, Ph.D., Autism Support Services, Autism Consultant - Julie Donnelly has a Ph.D. in Special Education from the University of Missouri-Columbia, focus area in autism and over 26 years of teaching and consulting experience. Julie teaches university classes and serves as an autism consultant to schools. She has a private practice, Autism Support Services, through which she gives workshops and trainings on autism and consults with families, schools and agencies, assisting them to create programs and supports. Dr. Donnelly speaks at national and international conferences and publishes in the autism and special education areas. Julie is the mother of Jean-Paul Bovee, who experiences autism. Web site www.autismsupports.com
 
He isn't paying attention. She won't follow directions. They aren't completing their work. Are they not complying because they are bad kids? Or are there reasons why they can't comply? We can sometimes find someone or something to blame or we can give it a disability name, but that doesn't solve the problem. Even though it seems as if the problem is in them, the solution is usually us changing something in ourselves, the environment, curriculum, and/or teaching the behavior that we would like the student to have.

Some of the strategies that we will consider and present examples of are:

Using one to one instruction and/or Discrete Trial Training to teach attention to task, compliance and understanding that learning can be a positive experience.

Making the rules and expectations clear and visual

Getting their body and sensory system to optimum readiness for learning. Teaching students to self regulate their energy and attention with programs such as How does your Engine run?

Finding the right motivator and creating a motivation system for students who do not readily respond to traditional reinforcement systems.

Finding the right materials and learning style for students who don't learn in traditional ways.

Teaching students the connection between their actions & the consequences through visual explanations and reminders.

Teaching students to self manage and reward themselves for self control and achievement.

Providing choices throughout the school day so that students feel in control of some aspects of their experience.

Providing good adult models of the behavior that we would like them to demonstrate.

Providing peer support for appropriate behavior.

Whether students can't or won't, we must look for positive supports that teach and encourage. When we use such supports, we are more likely to have success with difficult students and our day will be less frustrating.

See more of The ASA's 37th National Conference on Autism Spectrum Disorders (July 13-15, 2006)